News

Sharks: 12 interesting facts about the marine fish

Please log in or register to do it.

Shark sightings on the East Coast have been on the rise while Americans flock to beaches in hopes of cooling off.

Rockaway Beach in New York was shut down Tuesday, Aug. 8, after a woman was hospitalized following a rare shark attack, Fox News Digital reported. She was transferred to Jamaica Hospital in critical condition, but her health status has been upgraded to serious/non-life threatening.

In Massachusetts, there were multiple shark sightings recently at Cape Cod, which prompted officials to close Marconi Beach to swimming.

SHARK ATTACK IN SUMMER: HERE’S WHAT TO DO AND HOW TO STABILIZE A VICTIM IN REAL TIME

Here are 12 number-based facts on sharks including the population, size and more.

shark swimming with fish

Sharks are considered to be a long-bodied marine fish with a cartilaginous skeleton and a prominent dorsal fin. (iStock)

400+ – There are more than 400 known species of shark in seas around the world, according to Shark Research Institute.

1 billion – Marine experts estimate that the total shark population is around one billion, according to A-Z Animals, an online animal encyclopedia.

“This means there’s a shark for every seven or eight humans,” the encyclopedia noted in July 2022. “They can be found in every ocean in the world and just about every oceanic habitat, including the open ocean, deep sea, coral reefs, shallows and beneath Arctic ice.”

SHARK ATTACK IN SUMMER: HERE’S WHAT TO DO AND HOW TO STABILIZE A VICTIM IN REAL TIME

61.7 feet – Whale sharks are the largest living shark species. On average, whale sharks reach 46 feet in length, according to the National Museum of Natural History. Some can even grow up to 60 feet. 

whale shark

Whale sharks can be found in warm coastal waters around the world. (iStock)

The world’s largest whale shark on record measured 61.7 feet, according to a 2018 study from Nova Southeastern University’s Guy Harvey Research Institute – a university in Florida – and the Maldives Whale Shark Research Program.

6 inches – Dwarf lantern sharks are the smallest living shark species with an average size of six inches, according to the National Museum of Natural History.

The museum said the species is “smaller than a human hand” and has “only been observed a few times” in the northern part of South America at depths between 928 and 1,440 feet.

GREAT WHITE SHARKS HAVE SURPRISING DIET WHEN THEY’RE YOUNG, RESEARCHERS FIND 

4,095 pounds – Great white sharks have one of the strongest bites in the world. A 2008 experiment led by Australian paleontologist Stephen Wroe found that a 7,328-pound great white shark could exert about 4,095 pounds of force from its powerful jaws, according to a study published in the Journal of Zoology.

Great White Shark

Great white sharks can be found in almost all coastal and offshore waters around the world. (iStock)

5 – Most shark species have five rows of teeth, according to Delta Dental of Washington, a dental insurance provider.

In a Shark Week blog post, Delta Dental of Washington said some shark species “can have as many as 3,000 teeth at once” and “lose up to 100 per day.”

72 – On average, there are 72 unprovoked shark attacks around the world, according to the Florida Museum of Natural History. More than half of those attacks – 51% – happen to surfers and board sport participants. 

WORLD’S OLDEST SHARK VICTIM ON RECORD GETS DECODED BY SCIENTISTS 

Other victims have been attacked while swimming or wading (39%), body surfing or horsing around (6%) and snorkeling (4%).

Shark Cape Cod

Warning sign for great white shark biting incidents, at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. (Lindsey Nicholson/Universal Images Group via Getty Images | iStock)

57 – In 2022, there were “57 unprovoked shark attacks on humans worldwide,” according to a report published by Statista in March 2023. Five of those shark attacks were fatal, the data company wrote.

1 in 3.7 million – The chance of being killed by a shark is one in 3.7 million, according to National Geographic.

5-YEAR-OLD SEEMINGLY FINDS ANCIENT MEGALODON TOOTH WHILE VACATIONING IN SOUTH CAROLINA

100 million – Researchers estimate that 100 million sharks are killed each year around the world, according to American Oceans – an organization dedicated to coastal restoration, protection and preservation. This is due in large part to major fishing countries using “destructive fishing practices,” according to greenpeace.org, which cited an article from nature.com, a British weekly scientific journal.

swimming sharks underwater

There are hundreds of known shark species. (iStock)

450 million – Sharks have existed for 450 million years, according to The Natural History Museum, London.

The museum said the finned animal appears in fossil records before the existence of trees and sharks have survived five mass extinctions.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

98 feet – The since extinct megalodon is believed to be the largest shark species in world history. A 1909 jaw reconstruction put together by American paleontologist Bashford Dean estimated that megalodons could grow to be 98 feet long, according to Fossil Era, a fossil specimen provider.

In this March 16, 2011, photo children look at the Shark Jaw of a Megalodon, a prehistoric shark, at the Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. The jaw is 11 feet wide and almost 9 feet tall, it consists of 182 teeth collected from South Carolina rivers. The jaws go on sale in June at Heritage Auctions in Dalas _ the starting bid is $625,000. (AP Photo/Rich Matthews)

In this March 16, 2011, photo, Children look at the jaw of a megalodon, a prehistoric shark, at the Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas on March 16, 2011. The jaw is 11 feet wide and almost 9 feet tall, it consists of 182 teeth collected from South Carolina rivers. (AP Photo/Rich Matthews)

In recent years, scientists have downgraded Dean’s estimate to 68.6 feet. Full skeletons have yet to be found, but megalodon teeth are discovered around the world often. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Megalodons reportedly became extinct 2.6 million years ago during the end of the Pliocene era, according to The Natural History Museum, London.

Related Posts
Imprisoned US Marine vet Paul Whelan assaulted over ‘political differences,’ Russian news agency reports

New details have emerged after imprisoned U.S. Marine veteran Paul Whelan was allegedly assaulted by another inmate in a Russian Read more

Michigan working on lucrative contract extension for Jim Harbaugh with interesting caveat: report

As Jim Harbaugh and the Wolverines focus on preparations for next month’s College Football Playoff semifinal against Alabama, the University Read more

Veteran aims to be the first female Marine ever elected to Congress, joins race to flip coveted Dem-held seat

FIRST ON FOX: A U.S. Marine Corps veteran and security official in Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin's administration is aiming to Read more

NY judge to consider Marine Daniel Penny’s motion to dismiss case in Jordan Neely’s subway chokehold death

Daniel Penny is expected to return to a New York City courtroom on Wednesday where a judge will decide whether Read more

Illinois Democrat warns Biden looks 'very frail,' risking race: 'Have to be honest ... it's getting worse'
Trump Presses G.O.P. for Platform Draft That Softens Stance on Abortion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *